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skiddingtowardsretirement

semi-retiring, work life balance, lifestyle block living

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Putting the house in order

Having publicly committed to retiring in the New Year, I am getting my house in order.

This means making decisions about what we need to do to make our retirement work well for us. I have therefore got a list and a budget – a true Virgo, right?

My list started off with many grand things including recarpeting the house, recurtaining the bedrooms, a new fridge and a tent for copious camping trips. I have subsequently rethought this and the list is no longer an absolute, rather it can now be described as ‘a work in progress’ with items being added, taken away or parked.

The changes I have made are sensible ones, I think. I have decided against recarpeting – the carpet is fine and I am just bored with it. I also want to replace it with wool (it is wool now) and that is not cheap. I will therefore do it in a few years when most of our retirement savings can be accessed. The curtains – well, I have washed them initially in a bit of bleach, followed by a rinse and two out of the three sets are perfect again. The other one? A sad story really that would bring a tear to any house proud person’s eyes – suffice to say, I will buy new ones!

The new fridge? Well, I have purchased one after much research (how big, what make, energy rating etc etc) and it is looking mighty fine in the kitchen. The power bill has also reduced which is an added bonus.

The tent for our NZ trips has been relegated to the ‘decision pending’list. I will keep the $$ aside for it in the budget.

New additions to the list include a cat door with a microchip so our kind neighbour can feed our moggies, rather than every cat in the neighbourhood when we are away adventuring. I have also factored in some maintenance including the three yearly septic tank clean and new glasses for me.

Meanwhile, I am saving hard for this early retirement lark, albeit I am fast coming to the conclusion that we will dip into our savings pot early if required so we can do the things we want to when we want to. Yes, life is short, and we don’t want to live with regrets.

Carpe diem, folks!

PS I have been told I can join the temp pool at the hospital where I work any time which is kind of nice, though at this stage this is not what I see in my future.

New Life – Mission accomplished

Dear Readers,

This is my last post.

The man and I have achieved what we set out to do: change our lives.

Thank you for following us on our journey and encouraging us (mostly) and caring for us (always).

The man and I are very different beasts. He jumps in boots and all, with hardly a thought about the implications further down the track. I am the polar opposite: I plan and think and overthink before I take the first cautious step to alter things that no longer are making me happy.

The step to move away from Auckland to a smaller place was always a dream for us. To have a shed and some land was the ultimate goal. We spent years  discussing it and more than one road trip exploring areas that might meet our needs.

But  in spite of saying when I started ‘Skidding towards retirement’ that we were going to make the change within two years, we still may have been living the same old Auckland life now, while paying lip service to our dream.

Except for one thing: I found myself in a stressful situation at work. One that no matter how hard I tried, and  I did try mightily hard to sort it, I couldn’t solve.

At the time, it was distressing.   I had many close colleagues I  worked with who I respected and enjoyed and who supported me at the time – and I am sure that wasn’t easy, as I was pretty wound up. Thank you. I also had  a community I knew and loved.

I was also well paid.

It wasn’t enough.

Thoughts of escaping filled my day. Overthinking Heather threw caution to the wind. Our ‘maybe’ plan to leave Auckland was brought forward.

We put houses on the market and bought at auction with a long term settlement.

Meanwhile, I ditched the job. Heart breaking at the time, but strangely liberating.

We have now been in our new home for 18 months. Our home has the shed and the land. It is also surrounded by beautiful beaches. A bonus.

I have a job I like and the man is working in a boat yard. I am back studying too.

We are forming friendships up here, while still retaining close contact with  family  and  friends in Auckland.

Change is hard. No doubt.  But in this case, it was the best move ever.

Simply: life is amazeballs

Au revoir , Readers.

x Heather and Grant

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Life – Eternally Grateful

As it is coming up to a year since we moved from Auckland, I thought it was the right time to  say a thank you to all the people who have made the last year one of the best years ever for the man and me.

In no particular order, here we go!

Thanks to our friends and family for understanding why we wanted to make the move  and encouraging us (mostly) to follow our dreams.

Thank you to these same friends for being solid and keeping in touch with us, even though we were at least two hours away from the nearest ones of you!

Thank you also to those friends who have made the trip up to see us. We have enjoyed seeing you and sharing our new life with you. Please continue to visit. And to the others who haven’t made it yet, there is always a bed!

The same goes for family..  thank you for letting us leave, and for keeping us close, even though we were a bit further away.

Thank you to our new neighbours for putting out the hand of friendship and making the move here way easier than it might have been. We will always be grateful to Marie and John for the early morning visit the day after we moved to welcome us to the neighbourhood, Angela for popping in with a cake and an invite to her weekly patchwork group, Kevin from next door for calling in to introduce himself, and Brian for inviting us to dinner to meet his family.

Forming connections within this close knit community was made so much easier by these kind people.

Thank you to our tame farm manager, Kayel for helping whip the land into shape by making hay and then putting sheep on it. We will always be grateful for  your (ongoing) patience and tender handling of us townies.  Yes, we know you don’t normally pick up a stillborn lamb and place her/him in a special box, but you did so for us. We also know that home kill means on the property,  but this would be far too much for us, so you made sure the deed was done somewhere else. You will be pleased to know that I no longer feel squeamish about eating the animals on our land – I figure they had a good life with us and it would be a crime for omnivorous me not to eat their meat. After all, they made the ultimate sacrifice.

There is one proviso though, Kayel –  Wendy the lamb whom you hand raised and is now causing mayhem on our property by being the biggest escape artist out  will live a long and good life here.  Why? Because she views herself as more human than sheep and answers to her name so, no, there will be no freezer in her future.

Thank you to Clements Contractors for giving me the opportunity to try something new in the employment field. I love every day here, and yes, although my pay is considerably less,  my job satisfaction is off the scale.

So what do I like about my new place? Besides loving the challenge of learning a new job, I love the diverseness of the people I work with, their unfailing humour,  realness (yes, you know when they have had a bad day.. they take no prisoners),  kindness, and approach to life.  Lastly, I also must mention the owners, Sandra and Murray.  The  caring culture they have created here is amazing, and I feel so very lucky to be part of this. Total respect, guys!

I would like to thank the person who built the house we live in and the people who planted the garden.  The house is so easy to live in and does everything it should sun wise. And we love having a fire again for winter.

As for the garden, whoever planted it did the most awesome job. Colour galore – as one lot of flowers fade, another lot come into bloom. All through the year. Spectacular.

The same for the fruit trees, as the last of our mandarins are on the tree, the earliest summer fruits are ready to pick. Plums, apples, peaches, nectarines and apricots – yum! When we say goodbye to these, it will be feijoas and guavas. Not to forget the olives and macadamias! And then the cycle will begin again.

Lastly a big thank you to our Auckland friends, Raewyn and Garry who moved up here first and convinced us on a visit to theirs that it was a pretty good place for us to move to. You were 100 % right. We feel totally at home here and can’t imagine ever leaving.

Change is never easy and it certainly pushed us out of our comfort zone. It was, however, the best thing we have done. It has opened our eyes to a new way of living, and energized us.

Not to put too fine a point on it, we think it has been the making of us!

We are happy and content and the only regret we have is that we didn’t do it sooner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Life – Change master

It’s been three weeks since I rejoined the work force. For two weeks of this, I was running tandem jobs i.e.  electoral returning officer for the Advance voting part of the election and my new role as Health and Safety Administrator. This means I have had three pay days to date since becoming a working girl again.  I have another full pay due this Wednesday coming too.  How does it feel? Well, simply fantastic – there will be no more dipping into capital to survive!

Moving without a job was the downside of the change process for me. I did have thoughts of working for myself and explored many business ideas, but the fact is  working for myself is not what I want. There, I’ve said it!

Yes, this girl likes working for someone else. I like the structure of it. I like the regular pay packet. I also like the social aspect. I didn’t want to return to working full time however – it would compromise the lifestyle I was aiming for too much. I, therefore, am happy to be working three to four days per week 9-5, with the occasional early start and later finish (note the change from my last post where my day was going to be 7.30-5… there’s been a rethink on the part of the boss… phew!)

So what is the man up to. He is working for himself and is happiest that way. A creative soul, he is just about to launch some lovely outdoor furniture with a retro twist to it.

Successful change means recognizing what you want, but it also means recognizing who you are and then shaping the change to fit those parameters. For me, it is not working for myself; for the man, it is.

Which brings me to another story. My Dad changed his life entirely. Born in 1929 in Coventry, he was the third son of Lilian, nee Timbs, and John Downing.

Unlike his two older brothers, he was too young to serve in World War Two. He did, however, join up in 1947 and head to Germany where he served in the occupational forces. After leaving the army, he became a merchant seaman.

At some point, he decided that he would make New Zealand his home. He subsequently failed to get back on his ship when it was due to leave Auckland.

He lived the rest of his days in New Zealand, visiting England only twice.

When my last remaining English uncle died, my cousin told me they had photos that Dad had sent his family of life in New Zealand and they would return them to me.

The photos duly arrived and I looked through them.

Dad had missed his vocation – he should have worked for the NZ Tourism Board. The photos portrayed his adopted country in the best possible light. They also portrayed the family in the best possible light. The classic one being of my mother in shorts and running shoes. On the back, Dad had written: Dorothy going for a run. My sister and I can tell you categorically that my mother NEVER EVER went for a run!

I never really understood why my father left his loving family to move to the other side of the world until I spent time in England.

My dad was a Depression baby of working class parents. As an 11 year old child he was in Coventry when the Germans bombed the hell of it. It destroyed his city. It also killed his grandfather and, possibly, grandmother too*. Hardly surprising, Smith Street where they lived had an ordnance factory in it.

Yes, I am picking that his childhood would have been hard. It also would have shaped him. Going on the ships around the world would have opened his eyes to the possibilities of a better life for him, so he jumped ship.

So was leaving his family at the other side of world the right thing for him? As he got older, he missed his English family more and more. He also loved England: its countryside and its history. So yes, he definitely had some regrets. I do think, however, that the life he lived here was unobtainable for him there and he knew that.

Change. It’s never perfect – there is always a price to pay.

 

 

New Life – new reality

Yesterday morning at 6.45 am, I jumped in my car to head to work. The journey to town is normally light traffic; at this time of the morning, it is even more so.  Most people are either asleep or have a later start to their morning, I guess.

But not everyone. As I turned from Addison Road into Pataua South Road, I could see a milking shed all lit up. If I thought a 7.30 am start was early, the cow cockies working there would have been grafting away for a good three hours longer than me!

Regardless, 7.30 am is not a start time I am used to, but it is now my new reality. Or it will be until 1st October. This is when the summer season comes into play and my hours will stretch out even more. Yes, on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 7.00 am – 5.00 pm will be my normal working day. On Monday, it is even longer as there is a tool box meeting* after work. It was Monday yesterday. I got in my car to go home at 5.40 pm.

clements quarry.jpg

Am I worried about these hours? No, not at all. I have Tuesday off. And, unlike the rest of the office staff, there is no expectation that I work a regular Saturday morning shift in the weighbridge either.

So how am I finding it? The answer is great.

It might be early days, but I like the culture. I like the eclectic mix of quarry workers, truck drivers, mechanics, project managers, and office personnel. I also like the caring element of this firm – it feels like a family.

Its core values, which impressed me when I was interviewed for the job i.e. Safe -everybody home safe everyday; Trust – do what is right; Respect – treat it as your own; Accountable – stand up and own it; Friendly – great to deal with, and, the priceless, Clever – don’t do dumb shit, are not just written on paper, they are embraced.

I lay the responsibility for this firmly on the lovely owners. They walk the talk.

So in spite of the long days, safety clothing that falls short of elegant fashion, and the port-a-loo facilities masquerading as office toilets, this woman knows she has landed a great job with a great firm.

I have, therefore, cancelled the job alerts on TradeMe and Seek. I am here for the long-haul!

*Toolbox meetings are just another name for a staff meeting.

 

 

 

New Life – Healthy concerns

Until Wednesday last week, this old girl thought she was in fine form. OK, I may no longer be a spring chicken, but I did honestly think I was doing pretty good.

Oh, how wrong can one be? My body, Dear Reader, is failing fast. Or that was what I felt by the time I left the pre-med for this new job.*

It started off well with me flying through my drug test. At this stage of the proceedings, I had no hint that my world was about to crumble.

The first inkling was the jumping on the scales bit. The nurse then did some quick calculations and said ‘you are showing as obese’. She then looked at me and said ‘but you don’t look overweight, so I might have got that wrong, so I’ll recalculate it later.’   Right.

We then moved onto eyesight. Now, as way of explanation, I wear reading glasses and I had left them at home, so I knew at least some parts of this test weren’t going to go as well as they could. And I was right: I struggled with this section of the test. At one stage, the nurse said “see the red line” and I replied “what red line?” Not good. Not good at all!

And if that wasn’t bad enough, further tests showed I had compromised peripheral vision and was apparently colour blind.  I could see a white stick in my future.

Needless to say, a trip to the optometrist was recommended. A.S.A.P.

This obese and blind girl was next subjected to a hearing test. First I had my ears looked in, except nothing could be seen because of the build up of wax.  We then progressed to the hearing test, and, you guessed it, my left ear was not performing as it should.  I now had deaf to add to my list of health challenges.

It was probably a stroke of luck that my blood pressure and pulse had been taken prior to the drug test!

I am relieved to say that the other tests which included lung function and skeletal tests all went swimmingly well!

Now on Friday I went to the optometrist for a check up, and although I needed a new prescription for my reading glasses, everything else was tickety-boo. I cancelled the guide dog.

With regards to my hearing, I am sure getting my ears cleaned out will restore my hearing to normal.

Lastly, the weight thing – I now have a goal to drop 4 kilos! Until I do that, my string bikini will remain firmly packed away.

*My new job is Health and Safety Administrator  at a Quarry and Civil Construction company. I report to a contract Health and Safety Manager. Four years on the Health and safety committees at Auckland Museum and Auckland City Libraries has paid dividends and allowed me to change my career at what is quite a late stage in my life. Ironically, I got offered the same job at a Kumeu timber mill in 2003, but turned it down as the hours offered didn’t work with my uni studies!

 

New Life – well-situated

Today, after months of trying, I have finally cracked it!

Or I will have, providing I pass the obligatory medical and drug test.

Yes, I have been offered a permanent role. And it is part time, which will allow me enough time to help the man launch his lovely new product, and to enjoy our property. It is also a job which expands my skill set, and is not in an industry I have worked in before. Perfect.

The ironic thing is that after months of rejection – I tried not to take this personally – I was in line for two jobs! The other one, however, was a relieving job and I decided to sacrifice the flexibility of  this for a position that actually appealed more to me, not to mention the idea of regular money was pretty attractive!

So how come my fortunes changed? I think the fact that I got to the interview stage in jobs I have never done before was because I ensured the CV I submitted matched the skill set the advertiser was looking for.

Now I know that many CVs contain porkies, and some even stray into the area of outright lies, but rest assured, Dear Reader, mine doesn’t. It is absolutely squeaky clean. Indeed, as someone who is pretty self-deprecating, there is not even a whiff of exaggeration contained within.

No, my doctoring was simply a case of keeping the relevant information and deleting the rest. And this focused approach seems to have worked a treat.

The two interviews also went well – I finally have got my head around two winning interview techniques: engage brain before opening mouth, and, be honest, but don’t shoot yourself in the foot with this honesty!

The job I have accepted ended up being a two interviews affair. The first was the one with the normal questions, the second was ostensibly to introduce me to their software system.  And I did get shown their software system, but I also got to sit a numeracy and literacy test. Surprise!

The literacy part didn’t faze me. The numeracy did, especially when the first half contained the directive that this was a calculator-free test. What is that about? Anyway, I am delighted to say I nailed the numeracy test! Yep, one wrong answer in the entire paper.  Clever me, right?

As for the literacy test, it was straightforward. Strangely enough, the part I probably got the most wrong was checking the formatting in a business letter – it’s changed a lot since a 13 year old Heather sat in a 3rd form typing class (1973, for those interested).  And the fact is this girl no longer writes formal letters, she emails pithy notes to all manner of professionals and signs off with ‘Cheers’.

So what is the job? Well until I sign my contract, I won’t reveal all. I will tell you it is a Health and Safety Administrator’s role with an element of HR in it too. The firm itself  is in the quarry and civil engineering area, so it is completely outside my area of expertise. It also means a bit of fluoro, some hard hat wearing, and some serious shoes!

I am so excited. I know I am going to love it.

And meanwhile, until I start, I will be gainfully employed working for the elections!

 

 

 

New life – that Spring feeling

In the last week the weather has turned the corner and it is feeling considerably warmer up here.  Indeed, some days it’s been so hot that I have found myself abandoning my jumper in favour of a short-sleeved tee shirt.

We are, of course, on the cusp of spring  and this is code for ‘unreliable weather’, so I know there will be some days when the barometer plummets and winter woollies will be required day wear, there will be frost on the ground to greet us on waking in the morning, and the need for a fire in the evening will be non-negotiable.

But this is a small price to pay for the arrival of spring the man and I think. Yes, we now have lambs in the paddocks, with more to be born. Having said this, we did have a stillborn lamb. Perfectly formed, it arrived on a very stormy night a couple of weeks ago and was still covered in its membrane when we found it dead the next morning. Nature.

The garden is giving us lots of pleasure. It is sprouting flowers that we never knew we had: freesias, daffodils and other bulbs in hiding since we came in January are pushing through the ground.

The fruit trees have been whipped into order and I’ve started my spraying programme – codling moths: be gone!  In the vegetable garden, the garlic shoots are now visible* and the rest of the garden is being slowly prepared for further plants when my go-to book tells me it is time.

Today I planted the heirloom tomato seeds I got from the Heritage Food Crops Research Trust. Once they have grown into seedlings, I will transfer them into the garden, meanwhile they are sitting in pots on a sunny window sill in my study.

I also have put in the first of the potatoes in the garden, after leaving them in sunlight for the required 7-10 days to sprout. My go-to book says that potatoes can be successfully grown in tyres, and strangely enough I found a couple behind the shed today, so I think I will give that a go too. Or maybe, I should make delightful tyre swan planters out of them? The perfect Christmas gift for a friend or two perhaps?

We are also thinking about putting a couple of hives in. One of our neighbours has bees so we went to see them. It turns out our neighbours are actually hosts, rather than the owners of the hives. For the use of their land, they get paid in honey – more than enough for their needs apparently. This may work perfectly for us, so we will do some investigation.

Meanwhile, the man and I are spending a lot of our days working hard on a new product. Yes, we think it may be the answer to getting the income part of the equation sorted. The man is busy perfecting prototypes and streamlining the process while I am spending a good swag of time sourcing materials at the best possible price from suppliers.  It is very exciting, but the best part is that we are really proud of the product as it is beautifully made and fits in exactly with our buy local philosophy. Watch this space!

Yes, life up north continues to be enjoyable and we remain optimistic!

* The garlic shoots look remarkably like kikuyu grass – a trap for the unwary!

New life – well employed.

 

It looks like I am actually about to land a job! Celebrations all round, right? Well, yes and no.

I have (almost) got temporary employment for the election.  Yes,  I am in the running for a poll bunny job.

For those readers who are perplexed by the term ‘poll bunny’, this is the role which checks off each voter against the roll when they arrive to make sure they are 1. who they say they are and 2.  to ensure that the voter before the poll bunny is an upstanding citizen and votes only once, rather than trillions of times.

It looks like I might be counting the votes too.

And I may be a team leader on the day.

Oh, the power!

All those years of wrangling staff has certainly paid off.

Now these jobs are mine as long as I pass a small test tomorrow. I have been told I will fly through it. Blind faith from the woman who interviewed me?

Note to self: remember to take specs so I can read questions and tick the right boxes!

I also am in the running for an administration role for the aforementioned elections. This will mean training and working before the election and maybe some work after too. I am not sure of the hours, but being without a regular job means I have plenty of free time.

At the back of my mind, short term contracts which  replenish the coffers have immense appeal. I want the flexibility they offer. Either this or a part time three day per week role will work well for my lifestyle.

Ditto, the man.

I did sell out on this last week and went for a full time role. Again.

Over a nine month period, I have almost lost my way twice now.

Reminder to self: No full time permanent roles!

Luckily, I am pretty sure I won’t get offered it anyway.  I answered the change question far too honestly!

Note to self: if you truly want the job, Heather, learn to lie. Well.

Ultimately, however, the man and I still hope to run a small home based business.  We know what we want to do, but just have to finalise the product line*and how best to sell it. Internet? Markets? Retail shops?

Each has its pluses and minuses.

Decisions. So frightening!

Meanwhile we are talking to everyone we know who has financed the lifestyle we crave through a similar business model.

From talking to them, we know that by getting both the product and marketing right, it is 100% doable.

We will be sweet. We just need to back ourselves!

Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

*I, unfortunately, have a tendency to overanalyze things. I need to stop doing this and just do it.

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