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skiddingtowardsretirement

semi-retiring, work life balance, lifestyle block living

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Auckland

New Life – Eternally Grateful

As it is coming up to a year since we moved from Auckland, I thought it was the right time to  say a thank you to all the people who have made the last year one of the best years ever for the man and me.

In no particular order, here we go!

Thanks to our friends and family for understanding why we wanted to make the move  and encouraging us (mostly) to follow our dreams.

Thank you to these same friends for being solid and keeping in touch with us, even though we were at least two hours away from the nearest ones of you!

Thank you also to those friends who have made the trip up to see us. We have enjoyed seeing you and sharing our new life with you. Please continue to visit. And to the others who haven’t made it yet, there is always a bed!

The same goes for family..  thank you for letting us leave, and for keeping us close, even though we were a bit further away.

Thank you to our new neighbours for putting out the hand of friendship and making the move here way easier than it might have been. We will always be grateful to Marie and John for the early morning visit the day after we moved to welcome us to the neighbourhood, Angela for popping in with a cake and an invite to her weekly patchwork group, Kevin from next door for calling in to introduce himself, and Brian for inviting us to dinner to meet his family.

Forming connections within this close knit community was made so much easier by these kind people.

Thank you to our tame farm manager, Kayel for helping whip the land into shape by making hay and then putting sheep on it. We will always be grateful for  your (ongoing) patience and tender handling of us townies.  Yes, we know you don’t normally pick up a stillborn lamb and place her/him in a special box, but you did so for us. We also know that home kill means on the property,  but this would be far too much for us, so you made sure the deed was done somewhere else. You will be pleased to know that I no longer feel squeamish about eating the animals on our land – I figure they had a good life with us and it would be a crime for omnivorous me not to eat their meat. After all, they made the ultimate sacrifice.

There is one proviso though, Kayel –  Wendy the lamb whom you hand raised and is now causing mayhem on our property by being the biggest escape artist out  will live a long and good life here.  Why? Because she views herself as more human than sheep and answers to her name so, no, there will be no freezer in her future.

Thank you to Clements Contractors for giving me the opportunity to try something new in the employment field. I love every day here, and yes, although my pay is considerably less,  my job satisfaction is off the scale.

So what do I like about my new place? Besides loving the challenge of learning a new job, I love the diverseness of the people I work with, their unfailing humour,  realness (yes, you know when they have had a bad day.. they take no prisoners),  kindness, and approach to life.  Lastly, I also must mention the owners, Sandra and Murray.  The  caring culture they have created here is amazing, and I feel so very lucky to be part of this. Total respect, guys!

I would like to thank the person who built the house we live in and the people who planted the garden.  The house is so easy to live in and does everything it should sun wise. And we love having a fire again for winter.

As for the garden, whoever planted it did the most awesome job. Colour galore – as one lot of flowers fade, another lot come into bloom. All through the year. Spectacular.

The same for the fruit trees, as the last of our mandarins are on the tree, the earliest summer fruits are ready to pick. Plums, apples, peaches, nectarines and apricots – yum! When we say goodbye to these, it will be feijoas and guavas. Not to forget the olives and macadamias! And then the cycle will begin again.

Lastly a big thank you to our Auckland friends, Raewyn and Garry who moved up here first and convinced us on a visit to theirs that it was a pretty good place for us to move to. You were 100 % right. We feel totally at home here and can’t imagine ever leaving.

Change is never easy and it certainly pushed us out of our comfort zone. It was, however, the best thing we have done. It has opened our eyes to a new way of living, and energized us.

Not to put too fine a point on it, we think it has been the making of us!

We are happy and content and the only regret we have is that we didn’t do it sooner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Life – 3 months in

It’s three months ago today that the man and I closed the door on life in the Big Smoke and headed North to a quieter existence.

Since we have been here we may be living a quieter life, but we are way busier. A contradiction, I know, but let me explain. It is quieter because not only do we not have constant traffic 24/7 assaulting our senses, we have the luxury of being able to pace ourselves. You see, each day we choose what we do, rather than follow the regime that comes with working an 8 to 5 job.

Today for example we are having a burn off, but not before our new-to-us Massey Ferguson tractor hauls a few branches from a fallen tree to add to the fire pile. Son Number 1 has volunteered to do this job because although it’s work, it’s fun and he knows he’ll have a blast.

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After the logs have been added to the pile,  we will move the sheep from that paddock  before lighting the fire. Transferring the sheep should be straight forward. Except sometimes it isn’t and we are slightly wary of the exercise: the last time we moved the sheep, one bugger made a break for it and managed to get herself through the fence into the neighbouring farm.

This was beyond us. We rung Karl who owns the sheep. Is it a lamb, he asked? No, we replied, it’s a sheep. Well, you won’t catch it as they are bloody fast, he said. I’ll ring the other farmer and let him know our sheep is in his paddock. And he hung up.

Remember this is Whangarei time – nothing happens fast. Ever. For the next week, we watched the rogue sheep shadowing her mates in our paddock, occasionally giving a plaintive bleat to remind us she was lost.

One day we came home to find we were back to full quota in our paddocks. The sheep had returned.  Turns out the neighbouring farmer had rounded her up into a pen (think dogs and quad bikes here). Once this was done, all  Karl had to do was to get her from the pen back into our paddock. Easy as, right? Actually no. The sheep made one more bid for freedom, but this time round she had met her match. Farmer 1, sheep 0.

Anyway today there were no escaping sheep. They did exactly as we wanted. The MF has done its job and I can smell the smoke of the fire pile. In the background the chainsaw can be heard as the man and son No. 1 get stuck into some more fallen branches which will be destined for the wood pile or burn off.

As for me, once I have finished this blog, I’ve a house to clean up and some baking to do as we have guests this weekend.  In fact, most weekends we have family or friends pop by.

Life in the country. It’s beaut.

Not sure how I am going to fit that paying jobette in though?

Week 8 – New Life – 2 months in

Last night I realised the man and I have almost achieved what we set out to do when I started my blog. Yes, we are now living the lifestyle we were aiming for: the one with a better work life balance.

To do this we have spent the last 18 months actively reducing and/or eliminating debt so we could afford to work less. Of course, the aim was to ensure an excellent standard of living now and in retirement* –  this was never an exercise in subsistence living!

So how did we achieve it?

We paid off the credit card and cut it up, never to be used again! Now I know people use the 55 days free credit to their advantage, however it sat better with us to just get rid of it altogether.

We sold the rental which had a mortgage on it.

We sold the family home which did not have a mortgage on it too, as we wanted to live in a quieter place. We did give thought to renting it out, but we have had two nightmare tenants  -different reasons, but equally as unpleasant to deal with –  and decided it was not worth the grief!**

After deciding what we wanted, we searched for 6 months for the ‘perfect property’.*** We moved here in January. Moving here meant our outgoings went down substantially with a 50% reduction in land rates (not on mains for sewerage), no water rates (we are on tank and spring-fed dam water), no rental for a shed and no transport costs for the man to get to work.

In winter there will be further savings as our heating will be provided by a log burner. This makes sense as our land will provide the firewood.  At the moment there is not a wetback facility functioning, but the hot water cylinder is all set up for it and our intention is to get it up and running again in the near future.

In addition to this, we took the opportunity to review insurance cover, electricity, and internet and mobile companies charges. We changed some of our insurance policies, although we stayed with the same company. The house replacement cost went up (bigger house), but everything else went down a couple of dollars reflecting the area we live in apparently.

With regards to electricity, we also stayed with the same company, figuring out the $12 a year saving that the ‘What’s my number’ website predicted was not worth the hassle of swapping. We did change our internet and mobile phone providers though and went with a bundled offer from Slingshot. This saved us $40 per month or 2.75 weeks groceries which the parsimonious part of me applauds!

There are other savings living outside the big smoke too: doctors, dentists, tradesmen are all considerably cheaper. Petrol is cheaper.

Having said this, wages are often less too, but for us that is not an issue. I still think we will be on the winning side financially. And as for living the lifestyle the man and I were after – we are absolute winners!

What didn’t work out? There was only one thing we intended to do which has not panned out: go down to one car.

Yes, we still have two cars. Why? Simply because I will be heading back into part-time work and we live rurally and do not have public transport option. Two cars, therefore, makes sense. We will review this once I retire.

There are also two things that still need to be sorted. The first is my income and the second is selling the boat.

For those who remember, after 39 years in the same profession,  I said adios to my job in September.  Phew! My intention is to work part time and in a different field if at all possible. I also have an idea for a small business. This will all happen after June.

Why? Because a long-planned six week trip to Canada and UK has made me unemployable! I mean who in their right mind is going to employ someone who is going on a long overseas jaunt a month after I start?

Now the boat. We have used it once this summer. Meanwhile it is growing all sorts of life forms on its hull. Sadly, we can’t see this pattern altering. Our lives have changed. We are busy doing other things.

It now makes absolute sense to sell it to someone else who will use it as it should be used. We have priced it accordingly. We hope it sells fast.

So has anything changed since moving here?

Yep. My attitude to eating the livestock in our fields. I am a meat eater. It is time for me to be honest about where it comes from. I bought a freezer last week. Karl, our farm manager will organise everything. I do think I may be out when the homekill truck rocks up for the first time though – forgive me for this bit of denial!

So where to from now in relationship to the blog?

I think for the remainder of the year, a monthly update is in order. After that I think the man and I should be completely settled in our new work/life balance. Mission accomplished and all that!

I also think I might have sorted out the use of commas by then correctly… miracle, right?

* Financially we are well set up for  retirement. We were in Auckland too, but our outgoings are cheaper here which is always a win.

**a small lifestyle block with a shed and a nice house with 3 bedrooms, and a fireplace preferably, which was located near the water in Whangarei

*** Most tenants we have had have been exemplary people.

Marmalade days

In 7 days the furniture truck will arrive to pick up our stuff to take to our new home in Whangarei.

At the moment, the man and I are too caught up with cleaning out cupboards and sorting final readings and new connections to give much thought to this new life north of Auckland.

Yes, we have a vague idea of how we want it to be: a better work/life balance, but, to be honest, the finer detail as to what that is going to look like is still missing at the moment.  We do know our income is going to be derived from several streams: the man’s business, my part time paid work, an AirBnB and perhaps some sort of payment from the land.

The property we have bought is 3 acres (just over 1 hectare for those readers who work in metric measurements) with a house,  the big shed for the man and his business plus several other outbuildings. The majority of the land is presently in pasture, although in a former life part of it was used for growing calla lilies commercially (obviously not on a huge scale).

The big question is what do we do  with the land? After some thought, we have realised that we aren’t interested in running stock for our meat supply so we have closed the door on that idea. We also don’t fancy mowing it, even though the ride on mower is going to have novelty value. At least in the beginning. So after thinking on it a while, the man and I have decided that planting some sort of crop might well be the go.

Now this is where I default to the librarian part of me. Sigh.  I have started researching options and although NZ green may be the crop of choice in the north, I have decided that we won’t be going down this track, rather Seville oranges might be where the man and I put our money.

Now for those of you who don’t know, Seville oranges are the traditional oranges used in marmalade, are quite sought after and freight well. And even better, from my reading to date, I think the land and climate we have will lend itself to Sevilles. So here’s the cunning plan: plant a trial crop of half an acre in the first eighteen months on the land and see how it goes.

If our calculated punt is right and they grow and they sell, we plant more. And maybe at that stage, we investigate the feasibility of putting in a small commercial kitchen to do the value added bit by making preserves (now those who know me well will know I like preserving so I kind of fancy this!). Regardless, if it works out and the fruit grows well, it will be magic, if not we will look at other options for our small part of God’s own.

And in the meantime, we’ll have a heap of fun doing it.

Packing up

In just a smidgen short of a calendar month we will be leaving Auckland and moving up north.

The man and I can’t wait. It feels like it has been a long time coming, but in the scheme of things it probably isn’t at all. It’s just that we are ready to go.

Meanwhile our days  are spent sorting through our worldly belongings, dividing them into the three piles of keep, chuck, and gift. It is at this stage that we give thanks that we are not hoarding folk!

Our conversations are full of  questions.  A tractor, a  ride-on or gator?  Or maybe all three? Sheep or alpaca? And if sheep, are they destined for a long life or the freezer? And can I cope with the latter thought? How many hens? What more do we need in the orchard? And how big should the vege patch be?

Our reading is now NZ Lifestyle Block. Our internet browsing is TradeMe. The farm implement bit.

And the Seek website. Because I am still applying for jobs. Sort of.

You see, I have other priorities. I want to paint the house interior and get stuck into the garden. Yes, I may be way too busy for that paid work lark for a while.

I’m not going to fret and worry though, there is enough in the kitty for the foreseeable. And besides, I have a feeling that the elusive job will turn up exactly when I need it!

 

Opening doors

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The Shepherd’s hut made for a client by the man. We will have one on our land  as an airbnb.

Aaah, you thought I had disappeared again, didn’t you? No such luck…I have been busy. Sort of.

And because I am busy still- sort of – this is going to be a very quick update.  You know ‘life for Heather and the man in a nutshell’, if you like.

So here goes:

The man and I became grandparents to Amelie Matilda. Now, we do have a delightful step grandchild who came into our lives when he was 5, but this is the first baby we have had in our family since our babies, so we are enjoying having lots of cuddles.

Our house is still waiting for that buyer to come through the door. Yep, it is languishing on the market in spite of it being in a desirable location and in good nick. I feel like I have an orphan and part of me is quite affronted. And yes, the market has changed and we have adjusted our price… no doubt it will sell, but I wish it would hurry up.

Meanwhile, we have bought at auction. No, don’t shake your heads .. we haven’t lost our marbles. Quite. .. ok, maybe a bit! Anyway, we have a long term settlement and will rent our present home if we can’t sell in time, but I do have faith that everything will fall into place and we will be sweet.

So let me tell you about our new home. It is in Whangarei Heads between Parua Bay and Pataua South. It is 1.19 hectares (3 acres, thereabouts) and has the ubiquitous shed for the man’s business, a shed for the tractor and ride on, a nice house (not flash – we don’t do flash) with 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, 2 toilets and a study for me.

The garden contains an orchard and there are big trees on the boundary for firewood which is a bonus as we do have a log burner in the house.

The property is situated a  5 mins drive from Parua Bay shopping centre which has the well-known Parua Bay pub with restaurant over the water in it, a large community centre and a doctors’ surgery ($18 a visit in Whangarei, by the way, for all adults – at these prices,  I may just go and see the doctor for a social chat!). A further 5 mins drive on is Onerahi which is a bigger shopping centre with the library in it (very important for us bookworm types) and a supermarket. Whangarei proper is a further 10 minutes or so on (20 minute drive from the house with the wind behind). But most importantly, our new home is 5 mins drive from a host of glorious, pristine beaches.

Our plans for the land include putting a shepherd’s hut on for holiday accommodation.

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In a past life, the property did have calla lilies growing commercially on part of it, so we are giving consideration to putting some flowers in for a bit of income. We will also run a few livestock and have hens. Very exciting… I can’t wait!

I have also started looking for part time work again up north. Working will serve two purposes: the most important being providing social contact and integrating me into our new community. The second thing is supplementing the coffers, although we are fine as we are for a while.

Yes, we are on track.

Life is good.

Living well

Pop the champagne corks, peeps!

I am officially semi-retired.

To prove it, I got my final pay today from full time employment.

So where to from here? I may be semi-retired but I am also completely and utterly jobless. This is not a state I want to be in for too long, and, hopefully, I won’t. I just have to find that perfect position – interesting, great hours, well paid … you know the caper!

My semi-retirement goal  has always been to work 24 hours or so per week in paid employment, with the balance of my week being spent doing other (more important) things with my time.

The driver here is I don’t want to enter (or, Heaven forbid, exit) my dotage with a long ‘I wished I had done’ list.

No, I want my list to be an ‘I have done’ and the extra time I have available to me should allow me to do the other things in life I want to.

Needless to say, the act of reducing my hours has resulted in a drop in income.  l have done the Sorted budget and  I think we can achieve what we want with careful spending.

Ok, there is an outside chance the venture might morph into “Scrooge lives again”, but I hope not. If this happens, the man and I will simply make the necessary changes to make it work. Stew again?

Interesting times! Exciting times! I’ll let you know how we go.

 

 

Too difficult

Sometimes things become too hard.

Sometimes it is tempting to give up.

And just keep things the same.

After all, the man and I have a pleasant lifestyle.

We live in a nice place.

We have a great support network.

Family and friends close.

It’s comfortable.

It’s easy

And that’s not to be sneezed at.

So why are we turning our world upside down?

Without making changes, we will be stuck.

Living as we always have.

There’s nothing wrong with this.

For other people.

It is not, however, what we want.

We have dreams.

The quieter life style.

Experiencing new things.

Working less to live more.

It might feel too difficult sometimes.

But nothing worthwhile is ever easy.

We have chosen this path.

We think it is right.

We will continue walking it.

Slowly….

To keep our balance.*

 

 

*We are working towards the original Feb 2017 time frame.

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