Last week the man and I packed the ute tray with ‘rubbish’ destined for the tip.

As we packed it, I thought about a comment I had read that throwing something away doesn’t mean it disappears, it just becomes someone else’s problem.

And looking at our throwaways, I agree. There was old flooring we had removed from our kitchen – this was a product that was made to look like wood but was in truth a cheap plastic (read oil-based) imitation. Over time, it had become chipped and there was nothing we could do to refurbish it.

There were three broken television sets. Two of these had belonged to a relative and had made their way into our dump pile, and the third one was our old one which after 15 years had finally given up the ghost. In addition to this, there were two dead printers from the same relative and my laptop that had died in one of those nasty computer death throes computers are known for.

We still have another load (at least) to go to the dump. This includes a tent that is old and rotten; a life raft and flares that are sporting expired expiry dates, and an inflatable dinghy that has lost its inflate bit.

In the main, the stuff we are dumping has been well-used and kept on life support for as long as we could. The same can’t be said for the expensive life raft or flares which have never been used but were bought for safety reasons and are to be dumped for the very same reasons.

We take some solace in the fact that the televisions, laptop and printers are being recycled, or should I say, some parts are : I have no doubt the non-recyclable parts will join the tent, inflatable, life raft, flooring and flares in the landfill. Here they will become someone else’s problem.