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skiddingtowardsretirement

semi-retiring, work life balance, lifestyle block living

Month

March 2021

Tractor goes

This post could be called a fingers crossed post.

Our tractor is now starting. It also sounds like something that would be at home on a battlefield.

We know, however, that with a bit of adjustment to the distributor (an nth of degree, apparently), it should/will be running sweetly again.

So how did the man get it sorted? The answer was through my last blog post ‘Tractor Woes’ which resulted in two readers who were mechanics shaking their heads in disbelief at our ‘replace likely stuffed parts until it goes’ approach. And not only did they shake their heads and roll their eyes, they decided to give us some advice on how to diagnose the problem a wee bit more efficiently!

And damn me, using these experts’ expertise was the key, and we now have a tractor that is showing signs of life!

Thank you, guys!

Tractor Woes

Our trusty Fergie has stopped working.

And we are are missing it. A tractor is, after all, a must- have item for townies new to country life, along with the ride on mower and a chainsaw.

The man and I did our research when we bought it – those new-fangled tractors looked just the ticket, but realistically they were for proper farming folks, not pretend ones like us. And besides, new heavy duty farm machinery was a tad overkill for our three acre block, not to mention the eye-watering price tag for those magnificent machines being way beyond our purse!

After much looking around, the man decided on a Massey Ferguson 35. Circa 1960, this model had a reputation for being a reliable machine and was perfectly priced for our budget – read cheap here.

We duly purchased one. It was the required red – the colour of most tractors in children’s picture books! It also had the ubiquitous PTO. It didn’t have the front end loader blade which the man had wanted, but he was willing to compromise and this one had a hydraulic tray which was a win too in his eyes.

Four years on, we can honestly say that the tractor has been an asset around the property. Sure, we don’t use it daily, but it is handy for all measures of lifestyle block requirements such as pulling out old tree stumps, shifting firewood, and towing old logs around, plus playing on (carefully) when our city friends visit.

Recently we made the decision to start looking around to buy a mower attachment for it. The reason being that we need to keep our paddocks in check, as there are no livestock grazing on the land at present.

So when the tractor failed to start, the man decided it must be fixed. Yes, he and Mr Google are on the case. They are taking a systematic approach to tractor repair- this involves systematically replacing pieces until it starts. So far and in no particular order, we have purchased new spark plugs, distributor cap, and high tension leads. Today we bought a new solenoid, and, still it doesn’t start!

Our tractor

The next thing on the list is an ignition switch. And maybe a Massey Ferguson 35 workshop manual, which could prove mighty handy at times like this.

I know this is a bit of a hit and miss approach to mechanics, but one day in the not too distant future, this approach will work and the tractor will splutter into life again and with all its new parts, it should be sweet for another few years!

Living a good life

Covid has made many of us reflect on what is important in life.

I thought I would share some of the things I think are integral to a life well lived:

  1. Live a good and ethical life.
  2. Stand up for what you believe in. Never turn a blind eye to injustice.
  3. This planet is our home: respect it and look after it.
  4. Public good trumps your wants and needs.
  5. Do not screw anyone over.
  6. Own your mistakes.
  7. Ask forgiveness when you need to.
  8. Prioritise relationships with family and friends .
  9. Happiness is a great goal, but happiness doesn’t just happen, it takes work.
  10. Respect your body; it is the only one you will ever have.
  11. If something in your life isn’t working, try and fix it first. This holds true for everything from fridges to relationships. If you can’t fix it, buy another (fridge), or move on (relationships).
  12. Experiences are never a waste of money; updating an OK lounge suite is.
  13. Failing does not mean you are a failure. It means you are human. Accept it with grace, not excuses.
  14. Being the best is not important. Trying your best is.
  15. Don’t prioritise accumulating money or things ever. Neither will bring you true happiness.
  16. There is good debt e.g to buy your home and bad debt e.g credit card debt. The former should make you financially secure; the latter will make the lending institution so.
  17. Don’t get wants and needs muddled up. Wants might be nice to have, but never screw yourself (or anyone else) over financially or in any other way to get it.
  18. Buying second hand is a win for the planet and for you.
  19. Don’t idolise other people, be they beautiful, rich or whatever; others lives are not what they seem!
  20. Be comfortable and happy with who you are, but recognise you are a work in progress .

I am sure you will have other things that you think are important. Please feel free to add them to the comments.

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