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skiddingtowardsretirement

semi-retiring, work life balance, lifestyle block living

Month

June 2017

New Life – Simply living.

 

I am writing this on a winter’s afternoon. The day is fine but slightly cold, so we have the fire burning slowly in the hearth. The man’s sterling efforts cutting and storing firewood over the summer months means we have no shortage of this resource.

This morning I made marmalade from the fruit grown on our property.  This is the first lot of 50 jars that I want to put down this season. The man is a marmalade fiend. I chucked some whiskey in this batch for good luck.

Yesterday I planted some rosemary. This is the beginning of our herb garden.

Earlier in the week I planted a couple of rows of garlic in the newly resurrected vegetable garden. I will plant another two rows in about a month. And other vegetables too.  Although only ones we like – no point growing produce we won’t eat. The rotary hoe we bought a couple of months back is finally earning its keep!

Last weekend our youngest son and his wife came visiting and he and I cooked a roast for dinner. The potatoes were found in an overgrown garden in the corner of the home paddock. He recognised them; I thought they were weeds!* The  lamb, too, came from our property and although it took me a few days to get my head around this fact, any reservations about the meat’s provenance evaporated at the first mouthful! It was delish.  And that rosemary I planted will be the making of future lamb dishes!

Last week I made guava jelly from the remnants of fruit on our trees. The trees were fruiting when I went away and I thought they would have been well and truly finished by the time I got back. They weren’t. There is definitely a longer growing season up here.

A couple of weeks before that I whipped up a batch of feijoa chutney. Again the fruit came from our land.

Meanwhile plans are afoot for the chickens. I have a bid in for a recycled roost on Trademe and have worked out where the hens will go. I am thinking 6 might be a good number – enough eggs for us and enough to gift to visiting family and friends.

Next week we have to think about pruning the fruit trees and working out what we want to do about spraying.  As we don’t know a lot about it, I will head into the garden centre and get some tips from our favourite shop assistant there (she knows EVERYTHING about plants). It is also the time to plant more fruit trees so we will be talking to her about this too.

In the next month or so, the macadamias should be ready to harvest. Not sure what I’ll do with these; but I’ll figure it out.

Country life. Perfect.

*This is now our official potato growing spot!

** I also have a bid in on a mincer which I think will be great for mincing fruit for marmalade etc.

New Life – Change challenges

 

Six months after moving from the big smoke to our rural idyll in Northland, the man and I can now say we feel we are home.

So everything has worked out well, you are saying. Another successful change story, right?

Well, yes and no. Lots of stuff has turned out smashing – we love our lifestyle block: the quietness and privacy, the orchard, the shed, and the animals make for our perfect life.

We love our new community too. Parua Bay is a place where everyone, regardless of whether you know them or not, waves as they pass on the road, and the shop keepers have time to have a yarn. And the beaches are amazing!  Nice.

There is only one fly in the ointment: the income side remains a work in progress.

As I’ve said before, we have a business idea or two which may or may not become our source of income – in fact, I have started experimenting with one idea, but if the drain keeps on blocking due to an inefficient ‘Heather’ manufacturing process, any profit will  just disappear into the wallet of the drainlayer!  No one said this working for yourself lark was going to be easy.

Meanwhile, I am attempting to land a part time job to refill the coffers. This has not been at all successful to date. I think this is for multiple reasons.

  1. As I want a career change, I am applying for things outside my area of expertise – but the fact is convincing someone that one’s skills are transferable is not easy.
  2. I am also at a certain age i.e. although I am fit and able, I am no longer a spring chicken.
  3. I know I don’t interview well – I am not good at talking myself up and tend to be quite self-effacing.
  4. As we were going overseas for almost 6 weeks, I mentioned this in cover letters. Honest me, right? Actually, it was job suicide! The interviews dried up. Completely.

Am I crushed by all this rejection? Well, I was on one occasion as I really, really, really wanted the job, so I cried when I got the ‘lovely to meet you, but, sorry, we have given the position to someone else’ phone call.

But on the whole, I am pretty philosophical about the length of time it is taking. You see, the man and I knew when we instigated this great lifestyle change that the chances were  it wouldn’t be plain sailing, and there would be some rough patches as we sorted out our new way of life.

Regardless, the changes that we chose to make have definitely been worthwhile and delivered exactly what the doctor ordered, even if there is still the odd challenge ahead! Having said this, we do feel we are totally in control of our destiny and that is an amazing place to be, we reckon.*

*I have been in a position where major change was ‘done’ to me. I found this really hard to cope with and went through a whole range of emotions often associated with grief. This response is apparently normal and healthy.

 

New Life – Jet setting

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Floating houses, Victoria, Vancouver Island.- perhaps Auckland needs to consider these?

It’s been over six weeks since I blogged, and I apologize, but I’ve been away with the man exploring the world. Or parts thereof, to be precise.

Yes, we left our rural idyll to hop on a plane which took us to the Northern Hemisphere. And as it wasn’t first class, or business class, or, even, premium economy,  voyaging to the other side of the world with our knees around our ears for hours on end required both fortitude and dedication. But we managed it and found ourselves (a very long) thirteen hours later in Vancouver.

From here, we spent 3.5 weeks making our way across Canada to the eastern seaboard. We visited Vancouver Island, Toronto and Niagara (don’t bother)*, Quebec, Halifax, Baddeck, Charlottetown, Lunenburg and many places in-between. We then backtracked to the very French, very edgy and very cool Montreal to catch a plane across the Atlantic to Heathrow.

During the ten days we were in Old Blighty,  we caught up with friends and family, plus saw some sights (Cutty Sark, Kenilworth and Warwick Castle, Stratford-on Avon) and explored Coventry where my Dad was born and his forebears lived. I also did some family history, but that is another story.

Now they say travelling is good for you. It opens your mind apparently. And it did. It also plays havoc with your budget, because travelling always costs trillions more than you think it will. But it is worth every penny.

Why? Because we have caught up with family and friends, met a host of (other) awesome people and saw amazing sights, and we will remember all of these things for the rest of our lives.

We have also returned invigorated and ready to face the world.  Or we will be, providing the jetlag abates!

We have a confession to make though.  Despite loving the travelling, we did look forward to coming back. You see this is our home and our life and we love it.

Brilliant, right?

PS Now we are back, we are going to focus on getting the income sorted. We think it is the adult thing to do!

PSS And yes, we are planning the next trip, but that will be a while away!

*Toronto was the only city in Canada we didn’t like, and Niagara Falls is OK, but the town itself is basically a very tacky theme park.

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